Category Archives: Commentary

Overclock Experience on AMD FX-8350 CPU on ASRock 990FX Extreme9 Mobo Using 2400 Speed Memory

A few months ago I decided to sacrifice my AMD FX-8150 – re-purposing it as a decent 8-core virtual server instead. In its place I purchased one of the new AMD 7850K Kaveri APU’s. My former FX-8150 workstation had an Nvidia 670 graphics card and the system consumed a lot of power, even when barely being used for anything. The thought of a 95w Kaveri sounded great.

And it was – with the new Kaveri 7850K chip as my CPU/GPU (APU) and the Nvidia card removed, the system rarely consumed more than 65w (including an LCD 24″ monitor)! When I played the occasional game on it, or the odd video encode, the power would spike up to 150w easily enough, since I had it overclocked a bit. I love this little system and still keep it. But I found that there are times when I really need the raw horsepower I gave up with the FX-8150.

So I decided to purchase the newer AMD FX-8350 instead. Of course, this chip isn’t all that new, really. But after looking at various “not-just-mainstream-talking-head” benchmarks, and see it compared reasonably well with the much more expensive Intel offerings, even their latest and greatest, I decided to go with it. My old FX-8150 was so solid. I was hoping the FX-8350 would be the same, and give me a little more performance as well.

The Kaveri APU’s benefit greatly from very fast memory. The talking heads out there claim that the FX-series processors don’t benefit that much from faster memory, and many claim that the AMD memory controller can’t even handle faster memory speeds well, past 1866 MHz. I decided to purchase faster memory nevertheless, thinking I could always use it in the APU system, since I wasn’t that thrilled with the more bargain Team Group memory I purchased for it. So I bought the AMD Radeon Gamer series memory, 2 sticks of 8 gigabytes rated for 2400 MHz speed at a CAS latency of 11. Expensive, but I didn’t want to mess around this time, wondering.

I also bought the obligatory aftermarket CPU cooler: a Hyper 212 Evo. It’s a beast of a hunk of metal, but I kinda like that. And no matter what, I’m not putting water inside my computer. I’ll just keep the clock speeds down (and power consumption).

For the motherboard, I decided upon the ASRock 990FX Extreme9. I was going to go with the ASUS Crosshair V Formula-Z, but it was always out of stock at Newegg, and I’ve recently become more skeptical of ASUS’s quality. I only ever used ASRock boards one other time, for a router I was building, and the thing was a good price, and very solid. So why not? The Extreme9 even had the Intel NIC on it, and a 12x power phase, which is unheard of. So anyway, that’s the board I chose, and it was only $169 – while the FX-8350 I got for $179. 🙂 The 16G of 2400 memory was the most expensive of all at $199!

Anyway, to the point. That’s what I have, and why I got it. In this machine is also a Bluray SATA drive, 2 3T SATA hard drives, and 2 120G SSD’s. All of that, and one ASUS LCD monitor are plugged into a UPS to draw power. So I can see my power utilization. Not uber scientific accuracy of course, but close enough just to have a look-see. Oh and the big power draw (supposedly), I splurged on a new graphics card as well, an R9 290 OC – just to keep it in the family.

I shelled out the $100 to Microsoft as well to get a Windows 8.1 Pro OEM license. That always makes me happy.

This AMD FX-8350 machine does run very solid. Like a tank. Just like me FX-8150, I never can seem to bog it down in its responsiveness, no matter what I’m doing, including virtualization.

I don’t overclock that often, and don’t know a ton about it. However, I was surprised that I could easily get the AMD FX-8350 CPU up to 4.4 GHz and the memory up to the full 2400 MHz speed, all while just using the air cooling of the Hyper 212 Evo! It honestly shocked me.

Of course, that’s no big deal unless you are running the CPU at full throttle for a long period of time. And what better way to do that, than to encode HD video using Handbrake – which maxxes out every single core for hours on end. It was my test, both of thermals and voltages, as I fine-tuned things.

People get confused about CPU temperatures. There are 2 different kinds. There is the CPU temperature at the socket, and there is the CPU temperature of the CPU cores themselves, within the chip. Both temperatures have different manufacturer suggestions/limits.

Using the ASRock motherboard’s automatic overclocking setting to reach 4.4 GHz on the CPU and 2400 MHz memory speeds, with handbrake running continuously my CPU core temperature maxxed out at 80c, and the thermal thresholds of the CPU cores reached AMD’s predefined limits, and the voltage automatically dropped at brief intervals to keep the temperatures below the supposed damage threshold.

So I thought, well, I should be able to lower the CPU voltage some, and the Northbridge voltage as well, and still be stable — and this should lower both my temperatures and power consumption. My thinking was, the motherboard manufacturer would want to pick voltages that were on the more greedy side to make sure the overclocks were more likely to work.

This proved to be a good move. I managed to lower the voltage on both the CPU and northbridge without sacrificing any performance, bringing the thermals down well below thresholds, and decreasing the power consumption by about 30 watts.

I’ll show you some screenshots I took while I was in the middle of running those Handbrake video encodes that kept the FX-8350 CPU cores pegged at full. The power draw you’ll see is reported from the UPS the system is plugged into. So here is a list of devices that are currently drawing power on that device:

  1. AMD FX-8350 CPU
  2. 2x8G AMD Radeon Gamer series memory @ 2400
  3. 6 120MM case fans
  4. Seasonic Gold something power supply 😉
  5. AMD R9 290 OC (MSI)
  6. Yeti microphone
  7. ASUS Bluray SATA drive (not actively spinning)
  8. 2 3T Seagate Barracuda hard drives
  9. 2 120G SSD drives (Samsung and OCZ V4)
  10. ASUS VN247 LCD monitor

All of that, with the CPU pegged out and overclocked to 4.4GHz, the system was drawing 307 watts! Of course, if the graphics card were going like crazy, it would be significantly more. But that just amazes me how little that graphics card will draw, too, when it’s not being used except for dual-monitor 1080p (one monitor is plugged into that UPS while the other isn’t).

When the system is idle but awake, just doing its normal system-y things in the background, all those things draw 121 watts with the CPU at 4.4 GHz still. Absolutely nuts! That’s some amazingly good power-awareness work, in both the CPU and video card.

As you can see from those screenshots, there is the idle power draw and the fully loaded CPU power draw running maxed-out FX-8350 on all 8 cores. Also, the AMD Overdrive screenshot shows those cores all maxed out, along with the “thermal margin”. This “thermal margin” value is often confusing to people it seems. It represents the number of degrees you have left to heat up before you reach AMD’s predefined maximum safe temperature per core. By lowering voltages I was able to give myself a comfortable thermal margin while still maintaining a completely stable 4.4 GHz overclock that ran and ran and ran.

The “ASRock Extreme Tuning Utility” screenshot shows ASRock’s included software overclock utility that came with this 990FX Extreme9 motherboard. It’s not the greatest utility – but it’s ok for tweaking some things. The BIOS is the place to do it, and the boot-to-UEFI feature is great. I am incredibly pleased with this motherboard. The ASUS stuff has seemed so buggy lately. I am convince that there is no way I could have gotten such a stable overclock with such low voltages were it not for this fine board (and perhaps the silicon dye god’s favor).

The last screenshot above is the CPUZ utility showing the memory speed and timings, in case someone doesn’t believe that an FX-8350 can run with 2400 speed memory. There it is! It’s using those AMD memory modules, though.  And if you look at the northbridge speeds in the ASRock utility screenshot, you’ll see that the bandwidth is there. I could probably even press it further. Haven’t tried yet, though. It most certainly increased my AIDA64 scores below. The AMD chips, even the FX ones, actually do seem to benefit from fast memory.

All in all, I’m extremely happy and surprised by this system. I’m also impressed with the memory bandwidth AMD has provided even on the FX series processors. I had an evaluation copy of the AIDA64 test suite, and included the benchmark results below.

What astonishes me is that there are cases where this FX-8350 CPU greatly outperforms even the i7-4770k from Intel. Of course, there are cases where the Intel i7-4770k CPUs outperform the AMD FX-8350 as well. The price difference between the two is huge, though, especially when you take into account motherboards with comparable features.

I used to run i7’s several years ago, but switched to the FX processors after experiencing how much better the AMD chips handled virtualization. I have no benchmarks, but using the systems I could certainly feel the difference. And virtualization is a lot of what I do. Playing games, I can never tell the difference. But if I’m playing a game on a system that’s running some load in a virtualized environment at the same time, the AMD system runs smooth, while the i7 system acts choppy. That’s why I switched.

But all silly Intel vs. AMD stuff aside, if I look at just this chip, and even the small overclocking up to 4.4 GHz, I can certainly notice a huge performance gain while transcoding video with Handbrake. I have also noticed that running the memory at 2400 MHz most definitely improves the responsiveness of the system, such that I can’t even tell when I’m running with all the cores maxxed out.

Honestly, I was a little hesitant about going with the FX-8350 chips, since they are older than the newest releases from Intel. But right now, I have absolutely no regrets. They are still amazingly great performing workhorses and absolutely rock solid. Especially if you invest in the quality components.

AIDA64 Extreme benchmark test results:

Anyway, I hope you have found something useful in all this. It’s hard finding any more detailed information out there related to specific use cases and experiences.

I’m so pleased with this purchase and have absolutely no regrets about spending the money for the quality components. And no regrets about not spending twice even that much for an Intel-based system.

Besides the incredible solidity of this system, the thing I’m most impressed with is how well it utilizes power. Although the FX-8350 chip isn’t the most power-efficient chip, it’s not bad for an 8-core! And it seems like AMD has gone to some great lengths to only draw power when you really need it, whether it’s a CPU or a GPU. I swear that R9 290 isn’t drawing any power it seems. You do see it when you’re gaming though.

Oh, and I should mention, I overclocked this while leaving Cool and Quiety enabled in the UEFI, and also C6 state on the CPU, which gives it the ability to save lots of power. This has not impacted the stability of the overclock at all. Then again, I’m hardly pushing this chip to anything close to what it’s capable of, either.

Anyway, just thought I’d share my happiness and enthusiasm in case you might be questioning similarly.

BTW – the hardware support for AES encryption on this chip is phenomenal. Encrypted disks and folders? No worries. 😉

The Pope, You and I. And Gadgets!

In recognition of an event that has not happened in more than half a millennium, the Bishop of Rome abdicating, here is a piece of music composed by Bach and played on a cathedral organ.

I am not a religious person in any traditional sense. However, I do recognize history. As much harm has been done in the name of God, so too has much benefit come.

Cathedral organs were, for centuries, the pinnacle of human technological achievement. The complexity, scale, craftsmanship, art and engineering was a major milestone. Cathedrals themselves are astonishing achievements.

While browsing through YouTube for a good video example, I ran across several submissions where the person taking the video within the cathedral could not help but continue panning around the vista continuously. Even today these structures manage to fill us with a sense of awe, whether we believe in any god or not.

The West has Christianity because of the Catholic Church. They brought education. And even today the Catholic Church strongly advocates academic achievement, even in deference to science, particularly amongst the Jesuit order.

I have never been Catholic. But if you are aware of our history in the West, you realize the significance – the impact the Catholic Church has had upon our most fundamental thought processes. It is our legacy, in many ways.

It was the first multinational organization, at a time, much like today, when all people were ruled by a very few individuals who held nearly all the resources and power. The Catholic Church brought a common sense of ethics and morality, and a respect for written law, that all Western nations, despite language differences, share in common. They became a force that dictators and rulers had to heed. And this helped bind Europe with a common identity that eventually transcended the notion of earthly rulers.

And that’s the key here. Transcendence. Moving beyond where we find ourselves. And this can be sad, painful and exhilarating. We look for a rebirth into something new. As individuals, and as nations. A rebirth into something kinder. Something better. Something wiser.

The Pontiff has abdicated his position, calling for someone who will be, perhaps, more open. But perhaps not caught up so much as us in all the fast-paced, momentary and superficial trappings we lap up. Perhaps while even being more open, he will still remind us of the importance – to look within ourselves.

God knows we need some good and big changes for the better. Or perhaps there is no being to know this. Perhaps we have to do this on our own. The harder route. The route where we must take responsibility for all that we say and do. And all that we do not say – and all that we do not do.

It is worth a prayer to something larger than ourselves. If only to our better selves that we aspire. May we all make wise choices in the time to come. And may we find peace and comfort in that.

A Linux Person’s Windows 8 Upgrade and Inadvertent Install Experience

The first night Microsoft released Windows 8 I bought a copy. What the hell, I thought – they’re only charging $30-some dollars for the upgrade. I don’t use Windows very much, mostly just for gaming. I’m a long-time Linux person and an advocate of free software.

My main workstation computer has several operating systems installed on it, one of which was Windows 7. It has 3 monitors, 3 hard drives, and 2 solid state drives. The 2 SSD drives were the first two drives in hardware order – that is, a C: drive and a D: drive in Windows terms. Both of them have Linux distributions installed on them, using an encrypted filesystem, so Windows can’t see the partitions. The 3 hard drives are next in the hardware line, each being partitioned with a Windows partition, and other partitions for Linux in various states of RAID and LVM and encryption.

I was actually surprised that Windows 7 would boot, not being on the first drive in the system. But it did. And this new Windows 8 was supposed to be the easiest thing to install ever, so I was fairly confident it could handle upgrading Windows 7 to Windows 8 using the same drive layout it already was.

I booted into Windows 7 and then went to the Microsoft website, where I ran the utility that looks at your system to verify it can be upgraded to Windows 8. The utility ran without a hitch and was happy with my system. It then asked if I wanted to purchase, download and install Windows 8 right now, on the spot. Sure, I said! What a new and amazing thing for Microsoft customers to finally be able to do. Recently it was a new and amazing thing for Apple customers, upgrading OSX. But we Linux users are completely used to this – in fact, online upgrades have been standard practice for Linux users for many years.

Before the download I had to enter into several lengthy legal agreements, but here it was! A single executable file. When I launched it, it did all kinds of thinking and verifying on the system before deciding my system was fine for the install, and then it took off. The first thing it wanted to do was uninstall my virus software and then reboot. After then, it chugged away for a good half hour or so, getting all the way through the percentage install bar, and then thinking for a few minutes with its whirly balls telling me my system will be rebooted in just a few minutes – then suddenly, that loud horn chorus denoting failure detonated from the speakers as a red X dialogue came up saying my install had failed. All I could do was click “OK”.

Thankfully, it left my Windows 7 installation in tact, only without virus protection, so I was still able to use it. I decided to reboot and try the install again. Wait, wait, wait…. then after it was completely installed once again, and telling me we were about to reboot into it, the install failed again.

Well, that was a waste of $30-some dollars, I thought! I imagined myself trying to explain to some robotic, generic, procedure-minded Microsoft tech on the phone the layout of my system. I can already here them saying, we don’t support Linux. Well, you don’t support the bloody chop saw and hammer drill in the garage either, do you, but what does that have to do with your damned product upgrade failing? And getting nowhere, until I removed all Linux….  …

Fat chance. Then I remembered Microsoft gave me the option to create an install media using a USB thumb drive, to perform the Windows 8 upgrade. Worth a shot. So I chose when running the install again to create an install media on the thumb drive, which took a strangely large amount of time. After it was finished, I rebooted and forced the system to boot from the thumb drive. Happily I saw a menu that gave me two options – I could upgrade my system or I could install a pristine Windows 8, but loose all my programs and settings.

Of course, I chose the upgrade. For two reasons. First, I don’t want to re-install the programs I use, and re-do all the settings. And second, I purchased a Windows 8 upgrade, and I know what hellish torment Microsoft will happily put any customer through when dealing with licensing and install particulars. Sure, it says it will do a fresh install, but if I do one, it will pretend to do things for a long while and then tell me it can’t because it’s only an upgrade license. Or, if I’m luckier, it might install, but will instead torture me until I pay out more money or spend hours on the phone with them trying to get license keys worked out.

So yes, I chose upgrade instead of install. And instead of trying to upgrade, it told me to reboot the computer back into Windows 7 again and run the installer from there, like I already had twice. So I did. Because I needed to feel pain at this point. And it failed again.

One last stab in the dark, I thought, because it really would be nice to bludgeon myself until I die in a bloody pulp. I booted into one of the Linux installs on an SSD and saved away elsewhere any files I needed. Then I rebooted to the Windows 8 thumb drive installer again, and told it to perform a fresh install on the first drive of the system, which was an SSD. Now this Microsoft could handle! What a clever Microsoft. What a good Windows.

Anyway. The installer finished successfully this time and I rebooted into a fresh, clean, completely pristine Windows 8 environment. Well, first I had to tell Microsoft my email address. And home address. And phone number. And my first dog’s name. You think I’m joking, don’t you? I’m not. They want it all now. They want you to use their “cloud” services. And giving them all your information is for your own protection. At least that’s what Mitt Romney wants us to think…

But you know what? After all the trouble I have a nice little Windows 8 workstation that I can, and have, re-installed many games into. And they work great. It’s not so difficult if you’re using Steam and Origin. Both Steam and Origin work well in Windows 8, as do each of the games I’ve tried.

The funny thing is, Windows 8 reminds me a great deal of Gnome 3 in Linux, and to a slightly lesser degree, Unity. Gnome 3 is far more sensible and intuitive, though. I honestly believe that any Windows user would have a much easier time moving to Gnome 3 than they would to Windows 8. And you know what? Linux is way easier to install and get going – if you go with something like Ubuntu. And it’s free!

I’ll be spending a good deal of time for a few weeks in Windows 8, getting used to it and giving it a chance. I do like it. But there is a great gravitational force built into it, to move everyone deeply into Microsoft – never to return to the light of day. I think they might be past their monopoly fears – and they’re using every trick in the book to lock people in. I mean, for the love of all that’s holy, how can you still have problems implementing simple IMAP correctly Microsoft? We don’t all want to use Exchange Server and your sync methodologies. Oh, I see, it’s not that you’re stupid and can’t figure out how to do IMAP correctly after a decade or more, it’s that you want it rickety so that people will get frustrated enough to pay to be chained to you.

Poor Apple people. They’re so dazzled by plastic trinkets that they don’t even realize they’ve gone so far down a dark one-way rabbit hole of their own. But I digress.

Yes! I like Windows 8. It will play my video games nicely I’m sure. And I like that horrific Adobe Flash works well in it, too. In Linux, maximizing Flash videos is always a pain, because it shoots off to some other monitor, and doesn’t stay full screen often when you click on other windows. Yes, full-screen Flash and games. That’s what Windows is to me. Everything else about using and computer, the tools, and the software, I like far better in Linux.

So there you have it – my Windows 8 upgrade and inadvertent install experience. Oh yeah, it is pretty, too. I think Ubuntu is prettier. Both I think are prettier than OSX now.

Why I’m Voting Third Party (and O.K.)

This election year I’m confronted with a compelling ethical choice. On the one hand, I cannot vote to re-elect President Obama because he has chosen to execute American citizens without any charges and without any trial. He has also pursued the prosecution of government whistle-blowers with inordinate zeal, creating a chilling climate for anyone who might consider bringing to light wrongs committed by our government. On the other hand, his competitive adversary, Mitt Romney offers no indication he would act more ethically and every indication he would act even more unethically, in even more areas.

Right now the United States has a two-party system. Despite any rhetoric, the differences between these two parties are negligible. Both use the collective might of the United States primarily to service financial interests, even financial interests that do not benefit the American people. That’s it.

As a minor aside, which inexplicably polarizes and paralyzes the American people, one party makes overtures to use our collective might for the immediate and tangible benefit of Americans, while the other party makes overtures to undo any power government wields over Americans. Both are perpetually unfulfilled promises. However, the ideological division it generates amongst the people insures the perpetuation of that two-party system.

I’ve never heard anyone entirely happy with their political party choice. People on both sides have considered voting for a different party that more closely represents their views. But they never do; myself included. You see, as the thinking goes, if you vote for the party you really want to, then you are throwing your vote away – effectively giving away the election to the party you hate. In other words, if you do not vote for one of the two parties, you are, in essence, voting for your opposite party.

I’ve even used that flawed logic on others, when I found out they intended to vote for a third party candidate. You’re just throwing your vote away! The other party will win because of your short-sightedness!

But I was wrong. Well, mostly wrong. I was wrong because they were not being short-sighted. They were, in fact, being rather long-sighted. They were voting their conscience and their convictions despite the two-party monopoly. They were lessening its power and grip over us all by ceasing to believe in it, and ceasing to feed it. I was also wrong because the only way to throw your vote away is by not voting.

Those people brave enough to vote for third party candidates are actually doing more with their vote than anyone voting for either a Democratic or Republican candidate. In a real sense it is one of the most profoundly revolutionary steps an American can take. And both parties know it. This is why they spend enormous sums of money and invest a considerable amount of manpower to keep third-party candidates off local ballots. It is a worthy investment of time researching what third party candidates must go through simply to survive staying on a ballot in one state.

I’m proud of those Americans brave enough and with enough fortitude to see the struggle through – to offer us all a real choice of candidates. I’m also proud of those Americans brave enough to vote with their conscience, not settling for a stick figure wrapped in glitz, spewing out platitudes like a high-priced prime time advertisement.

To be sure, any transition away from the two-party system will be a difficult one. It’s far more likely Democrats will allow their conscience to prevail than Republicans – potentially resulting in a long, desolate decline in what little remains, of humanity in government.

But perhaps not. Perhaps Republicans will take upon themselves that rebel spirit they claim to embody, like the tea-party terrorists of Boston harbor so long ago – and vote for someone they truly believe in, who is a real, honest American representative and not just some corporate/religious puppet. Stranger things have happened.

I know that I am done with the two parties now. Completely finished. Even though all other candidates are forced into silence and obscurity, I will actively hunt them down, and I will listen to them. I will get to know them; our own real people who are crazy and brave enough to stand outside in the open, saying, there is another way. I’m going to listen. And if I like them, I will vote for them. Because that’s my vote. And I am not going to throw it away.

Republicans, Listen – Unless You Are Very Rich Already

This will be yours, we promise

This is a flim flam man alert, brought to you by the letter “C” for “care”. Demand to know which taxes and why, when and how!

The Republican benefit to the American people, based upon the words of Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan, rests primarily in the promise of an economic boon for all. This benefit, they claim, will happen because tax cuts will create more jobs. More jobs will be created because business owners can afford to hire more people with any money not paid to the government, or can afford to buy more things from other companies, who, in turn, can use that money to hire more people instead of giving it to the government.

This notion appeals to our common sense and there is even some truth to it. We like simple, believable things. But as we know, common sense is rarely the whole picture.

The claim that Mitt Romney and company repeatedly make is that the majority of people are employed by “small businesses” and these “small businesses” are taxed as the individual who owns those small businesses; most likely a sole proprietorship or a simple Limited Liability Corporation. The misleading part of this argument is that federal taxes are assessed on your profit, not your expenses. You write off all of the money you have paid to employees, along with other valid expenses, and then you are taxed on that amount.

As such, changing this owner’s tax rate does nothing to help him hire more people – he can hire as many as he has income enough to hire, and not pay any taxes on the amount of money he has passed on to his employees. Even if his tax rate were 80% he could still hire as many people as he had gross income to cover, and only be taxed on the amount he personally had left over after he paid them.

So lowering this guy’s tax rate does nothing to help him hire more people, unless you believe that with his personal business profit he took for himself, he would choose to hire someone else for the company, instead of using the company to hire that person. And he would be very stupid to do this, because he already lost some of his profit to taxes – so why not just do it as a company expense before taxes? Of course, if he had enough profit he might want to hire a full-time maid or cook, and that couldn’t be expensed to the business. And in that case, perhaps there is some very minor economic benefit.

But the benefit is, most certainly, minor. When one has a good deal of extra personal money beyond the business, you only spend so much on personal things, putting that money into the economy. Most people will invest this money into stocks or bonds, taking advantage of even more tax breaks, making that money work for themselves.

This is where Mitt Romney’s smoke and mirrors are doing their best work. When Mitt Romney or Paul Ryan talk about cutting taxes, they are not talking about which types of taxes and why it might matter. When you buy stock, you are basically buying a chunk of a company, hoping that company’s value will rise. Well, some people use Wall Street trickery to hope the value decreases instead, but that’s another subject. If you buy enough of that company’s stock, you effectively own that company.

Now, when you buy a company’s stock and hold onto it, you might decide to sell it later for cash. Depending on what people are willing to pay, you might be able to sell your stock shares for more money than you originally paid for them. This money you made – this income – is called capital gains, and it is taxed at a different rate than people’s normal income tax. It is, in fact, taxed at a much lower rate. Right now, it’s 15%.

So if you decide you are going to buy Boeing, for example, and purchase 10,000 shares at $70/share, it will cost you $700,000. Let’s say a year passes, and Boeing’s value has gone up to $80/share, and you decide to sell all 10,000 shares for $80, meaning you get $800,000. That means that you have just made a capital gain of $100,000. You didn’t have to hire anyone to do it, either. You didn’t have to create a single new job. You just made $100,000 and you get taxed at 15%. If you were to make that same $100,000 by working for wages, you would have paid significantly more money.

This is the main way that people with money make more money. They do nothing whatsoever but ride the waves in the changing values of companies. There are companies out there, like Bain Capital, who purchase controlling shares in companies and subsequently do various things to that company to either increase that company’s value, or strip it down in order to help further other interests they might have elsewhere. You don’t give one whit about job creation. You can only care about increasing money for your own investors. Any impact on people can only be seen in terms of money, and if you make more money for your investors by destroying a thousand jobs, that’s what you do.

And the money you’re making for your investors is capital gains, taxed at that very low rate. This is the rate that Mitt Romney is most worried about. Honestly, the income tax on rich people doesn’t matter at all – it could really be 100% and it wouldn’t make any difference because most rich people aren’t being paid normal wages – they’re being paid capital gains at the 15% rate. Dividends count as income, though, which is a good thing – but very few companies even pay dividends any more.

Mitt Romney, Paul Ryan and the Republican party leadership don’t really care at all about income taxes on rich people. I honestly don’t think they care about income taxes on the middle class or poor either, other than they might be able to buy more things. What they do care about is the capital gains tax rate. They want it kept as low as possible because that’s how people with money make most of their money. It’s rich people income. And it’s the lowest tax rate we have.

Remember this when you’re hearing all the obsession on lowering taxes. Lowering taxes is good, especially for people with not a lot of money. But keeping capital gains taxes so low is doing nothing good at all. Now it might, if that vast amount of money was ever spent on things in the economy. But it’s not. It’s only used to buy and sell ownership in companies. It has to be, right? I mean, it’s the lowest tax rate, right? But it doesn’t help the economy. In fact it is the very essence of, if you want to make money, you have to have money first.

What escapes most Republicans, and indeed most people, is that companies – the management and the employees – are the ones doing the hard work, generating value and creating jobs. The people making capital gains are simply harvesting that hard work. Why not siphon out some of that “free money” and put it to work on such things as building our schools into cathedrals, elevating our next generation to levels unimagined? Why not channel that money into even more help in to private sector, who is just starting to reach out into space? Why not channel some of that money into making sure everyone can see a doctor?

It would certainly be a better place to live, here in these United States, using some of that money for our betterment as a whole, rather than giving only the wealthiest amongst us the lowest tax rates of all people, and even with that, allowing them to hide much of it off-shore. How does this demonstrate caring about anything but themselves? How can anyone believe we’re all better off that way?