Now, Airbus A380’s Only Wanted for Spare Parts

Singapore Airlines Airbus A380
Image by https://www.flickr.com/photos/aero_icarus/

Gosh, Airbus A380’s aren’t even wanted on secondhand markets or even for lease. They’re starting to scrap them for spare parts. After so many illegal EU subsidies!

I’ve tried several times to find out the real costs of A380 development, and you just can’t. What’s even harder is finding out who paid for it.

“In 2000, the originally projected development cost was €9.5 billion. In 2004 Airbus estimated 1.5 billion euros ($2 billion) would be added for a €10.3 Bn ($12.7 Bn) total. In 2006 at €10.2 Billion, Airbus stopped publishing its reported cost and then provisioned €4.9 Bn after the difficulties in electric cabling and two years delay for an estimated total of €18 Bn”.

Hehe. Airbus stopped publishing the cost ?

“In 2014, the aircraft was estimated to have cost $25bn (£16bn – €18.9bn) to develop. In 2015, Airbus said development costs were €15bn (£11.4bn – $16.95 Bn), though analysts believe the figure is likely to be at least €5bn ($5.65 Bn) more for a €20 Bn ($22.6 Bn) total. In 2016, The A380 development costs were estimated at $25 billion for 15 years, $25–30 billion, or 25 billion euros ($28 billion).”

The quotes there were taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airbus_A380

That’s just development costs. Production costs are completely different, and they are hoping to maybe break even. An absolute disaster though.

If you look at the company’s financials… well, there’s just no room for a blunder like this. And what’s VERY interesting is looking at how much tax deferment they get — Boeing is practically $0 in comparison.

This just makes me incredibly proud of Boeing for having such foresight, breaking into new frontiers with the Dreamliner while Airbus was so sure of themselves on things that would never be. But even more than that, I’m proud of Boeing for realizing that, even though it’s our only major commercial airplane company, they still must take full responsibility for their decisions and actions. Unlike some banks and car manufacturers (not Ford though). And Airbus.

Source article: How the Airbus A380 superjumbo went from an airline status symbol to being sold for spare parts in just 10 years