AMD Ryzen 1800x Performance and Experience

A couple days ago I purchased an AMD Ryzen 1800x CPU as part of a new system build. Having more that 4 physical cores is very important to me since I do a lot simultaneously, including virtualization. That’s why I stuck with my last AMD 8350 for so long. It’s been a great workhorse and still performs very well, especially on heavy loads.

I’ve heard mixed results from people about DDR4 memory speeds usable by the Ryzen CPUs – that they are very picky about memory and can never reach 3200 MHz. I had no trouble reaching 3200 MHz, and with a CAS Level 14 as well! I chose the G.Skill Flare series memory which purports to be Ryzen AM4 oriented, and which was in my motherboard’s tested models as well.

The motherboard I chose was, at first, the Asrock x370 Taichi. I wanted a motherboard with a good reputation, good features and a good price. I also wanted it to support ECC memory, as the Asrock boards do. Although I wasn’t buying ECC memory now, I tend to turn these AMD multicore systems into servers down the road, and having the capability in place makes me sleep better. 😉

The trouble is, I could never find the Asrock x370 Taichi in stock – it was always sold out. So I decided to buy the Asrock board which is the top-of-the-line x370 board instead, the Asrock Fatal1ty X370 Professional Gaming. It was a little more expensive, but it tended to be in stock, and it had a couple added features I liked: dual UEFI capabilities and it also had an extra 5gig network interface.

I had such good luck with my old Asrock board on the AMD 8350 system that this new Ryzen is replacing that I was confident going with Asrock again. I think these guys are my top favorite brand now after trying them in several different machines and form factors. The Asrock Fatal1ty x370 motherboard was a real pleasure to see and hold. You can tell some serious, solid work went into making these things. I have little doubt that the quality here is what made memory overclock so easily, too. And the CPU. Flawless and solid. I bet the Taichi x370 model would be the same.

The first thing I did after assembling the system was to enter the UEFI and use Asrock’s built-in network UEFI update utility to get the latest BIOS version. I love that you don’t even need to install an OS or mess with USB keys to update Asrock UEFIs. After doing this and rebooting into the latest UEFI, I just selected the memory profile for 3200 speed, and that’s it! Nothing else. Not one bit of hassle. I really have to hand it to G.Skill too for those nice modules. And they are fast with CL 14.

Asrock x370 Fatal1ty UEFI Screen

After this, I just bumped up the CPU base clock frequency from 3.6 to 4.0 GHz. Didn’t even change the default voltages. Touched nothing else. And there it was – perfectly stable. I’m very, very pleased with this CPU and motherboard. 🙂 I have never had a little bit of overclocking go so easily.

And power use? It’s just sipping power right now as I type this, with very little else going on. The CPU, a Radeon Fury video card, an LG Ultrawide monitor, a Corsair H110i water cooler/pump with its 2 fans and 4 additional fans in the case — all of that is drawing 105 Watts, 113 Watts and 121 Watts — it keeps alternating between those 3 values.

Ambient temperature in the room right now is 23C — the CPU is 32C. When I ran the CPU benchmarks shown below, the highest temperature the CPU reached was 42C very briefly. I’d say I probably have a lot of overclocking room if I want to.

I have to say, my experience with the the AMD Ryzen 8100x has been a real joy, especially when paired with this Asrock board. I can certainly feel a zippyness in normal use over the 8350, especially in such silly things as scrolling a web browser on a page full ads 😉 Not even one little stutter with this machine.

I haven’t installed Linux on it just yet – that will happen after I’m done typing this. But Windows 10 works wonderfully. And I really like this Ultra M.2 SSD. I went with the Corsair Force MP500. My Linux system will be on a normal Crucial MX200 SSD I’ll be installing.

So, the performance of using this thing — very fast and responsive. And you can load it up too, and not even notice. I’ve tried the gaming and recording at the same time – couldn’t even tell the difference.

For benchmarks I like to use actual CPU benchmarks and not just how many FPS a game might have. I used the AIDA64 suite here, which is a really thorough set of testing and system cataloging software. I’m going to have to buy a copy I think — I like the whole inventory aspect they have too for your systems.

Anyway, this Ryzen 8100x system performs absolutely, completely stellar on the benchmarks. It’s right up their with incredibly expensive 16 and more systems on most, and always right up toward the top. Of particular note, and importance to me, is its performance on AES encryption — nothing can touch it. This will be wonderful for full disk encryption on the Linux side. 🙂

I’ll include screen shots of all the benchmarks – I ran every one in the suite, just once, except for 1 I ran 3 times because I accidentally kicked off Thunderbird. Hopefully this might help someone who’s thinking about getting one. I honestly couldn’t be happier, particularly considering what I’m getting for the money! And I’m happy to have some solid new AMD tech. This system really feels well engineered.

FPU Julia
FPU VP8
AES
CPU PhotoWorxx
CPU Queen
CPU ZLib
FP32 Ray Trace
FP64 Ray Trace
Hash
FPU SinJulia
Mandel
Memory Read
Memory Write
Memory Copy
Memory Latency